Aged Woods® is 100% reclaimed and LEED MRc3 eligible
Reclaimed remilled antique wood flooring
Antique Oak

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A blend of reclaimed oaks native to our region, our Antique Oak planks range in color from light to medium brown.  A durable hardwood floor with minimum character and minimum patina.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Antique Distressed Oak

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A blend of reclaimed oaks native to our region, our Antique Distressed® Oak planks range in color from light/medium to dark brown and have more evidence of age than Antique Oak.  A durable and extremely rustic hardwood floor with maximum character and patina.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Bunkhouse Plank Oak

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A blend of reclaimed oaks native to our region. our Bunkhouse Plank® Oak floors are dramatically rustic. They feature a deep, dark patina and the original old-time circular sawcut textured face. This product is perfect for "mountain" homes and lodges, or any space designed with a similar decor.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Hardness (Janka): 1290-1360
Common name(s): White oak, Red oak, American oak
Scientific name(s): Quercus Alba L., Quercus Rubra
Mostly found in older forests, the average oak will grow up to 100 feet tall and three feet in diameter and will live to be 350 to 400 years old. In the fall, the leaves turn a variety of colors including red, gold, yellow, or purple. Through history, it has maintained a romantic association with constancy; a symbol of strength and protection. Best known of all the American hardwoods, it was the prime building material in the earliest Colonial days and was once the standard building timber in the eastern United States. White Oak's more numerous pores are filled making this wood the choice for water-tight containers.  Fine whiskies, wines and other premium  distillates are enhanced by aging in White Oak barrels. Oak was, and is, a fine choice for furniture, domestic flooring and interior millwork.
Antique Distressed Yellow Pine

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Antique Distressed® Yellow Pine reclaimed planks range in color from light/medium brown to dark brown with a very distinctive grain pattern.  A hard "soft wood" with a very rustic appearance and maximum character and patina.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Bunkhouse Plank Yellow Pine

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Our Bunkhouse Plank® Yellow Pine planks range in color from medium to deep and have the original old-time circular sawcut marks. Also included are blackened nail holes, insect marks and weathered cracks.  Bunkhouse Plank® Yellow Pine is an extremely rustic hardwood floor with maximum character and patina. This product is perfect for "mountain" homes and lodges, or any space designed with a similar decor.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Hardness (Janka): 690
Common name(s): Yellow Pine, Loblolly Pine
Scientific name(s): Pinus taeda, Pinus echinata, Pinus palustris
Southern Yellow Pine is actually a species group that is made up of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) and slash pine (Pinus eliottii).  Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris is also included, but we´ll deal with that prized wood separately. Southern yellow pine grows fast and straight with a clear long trunk. It is a "hard" pine, much harder than white pine. The color of the wood is warm pale yellow with a distinctive light and dark grain pattern.  It machines easily and is durable when properly handled, installed and finished.
Antique Maple Beech

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Our Antique Maple/Beech flooring is a blend of reclaimed maple and beech (they´re extremely similar) and is mostly pale colored with very indistinct grain patterns, dark knots and varying amounts of insect tracks as evidence of its past life.  A very durable alternative to oak.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Hardness (Janka): 1450
Common name(s): sugar maple, hard maple, rock maple
Scientific name(s): Acer saccharum
Nineteenth century women´s shoe heels and early airplane propellers were made of this hard, strong and close-grained wood.  Furniture makers from colonial times on have valued it for furniture.  And before colonial times Native Americans used it as a source of sugar.  Learning "sugaring" from the natives, it soon became a very important part of the New England economy.  For both its wood and its sugar, it is a very valuable tree.
Antique Distressed White Pine

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Antique Distressed® White Pine reclaimed planks range in color from light/medium to dark brown with a "wine stain" appearance.  A warm rustic floor with maximum character and medium patina that, over time, deepens to it's characteristic "pumpkin pine" color.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Hardness (Janka): 380
Common name(s): White Pine, Pumpkin Pine
Scientific name(s): Pinus Strobus
Until 1860 the Eastern white pine formed vast forests in the northeastern U.S. and was intimately associated with New England since the Pilgrims landed in 1620.  What was once a seemingly endless supply of timber was used for the construction of houses, barns and stables.  In the 17th and 18th centuries virtually every building erected by Colonial Americans was constructed with Eastern white pine, inside and out. Because of this, our customers are attracted to it for its traditional and historic uses in home interiors for wide board flooring, exposed beams and knotty pine panels.
Antique Distressed American Chestnut

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Antique American Chestnut reclaimed plank flooring has a distinctive grain pattern and range in color from light to medium honey.  An elegantly rustic floor with medium character and minimum patina.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Antique American Chestnut

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Antique Distressed® American Chestnut reclaimed planks may contain original circular saw-cut marks and range in color from medium honey to dark chocolate.  A dramatically rustic floor with chestnut's distinctive grain pattern and maximum character and patina.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Hardness (Janka): 540
Common name(s): American Chestnut
Scientific name(s):Castenea Dentata
"Under the spreading chestnut tree, the village smithy stands . . . " So begins the poem by Longfellow. Chestnut was storied for good reason: The chestnut was very important to early America as well as Europe. For several hundred years, areas such as the Italian and Swiss Alps, were called the "Chestnut Civilization." Its uses included candying, roasting, boiling, drying, flour and butter.  During the colonization of America, it was a premier tree, providing straight-grained, rot resistant wood for railroad ties, house framing, barns, fences and an important source of tannin for leather processing. The entire Eastern half of the U.S. was once covered with trees. It was said a squirrel could jump from chestnut tree to chestnut tree from Georgia to New York without ever touching the ground. Around the turn of the century, a blight was introduced from Asia, probably on imported Japanese chestnuts. By 1950, virtually all of the American Chestnut was killed.  The only remaining source for this wood is old buildings, mostly barns.
Antique Hickory

Antique Hickory reclaimed planks are light tan in color with occasional and distinctive dark brown streaks and graining. Being nearly 50% harder than oak, it is a very durable alternative to oak and produces a floor that has medium character and minimum patina. This is the hardest flooring that we sell . . and one of the rarest.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Hardness (Janka): 1820
Common name(s): Shagbark Hickory, Shellbark Hickory
Scientific name(s):Carya ovata, Carya laciniosa

Because of its extreme hardness and durability, hickory was used for early machine parts.  Before iron became prevalent, it was the ultimate wood of choice for quality barrel hoops.  Because of its physical properties it is used for shovel, pick and axe handles as well gym apparatus. Also, the best baseball bats are made from this wood.

Antique Cherry

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Our Antique American Cherry reclaimed wood flooring ranges in color from the lustrous dark reddish brown heartwood to the pale cream-colored sapwood. The grain is frequently wavy and satiny. American Cherry heartwood will darken over time to a consistent dark reddish brown. This floor is slightly less durable than oak and should be treated like a fine piece of furniture.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Hardness (Janka): 950
Common name(s): Cherry, Black Cherry, American Cherry
Scientific name(s): Prunus serotina
Colonial usage of the cherry tree was for its fruit, its medicinal properties and furniture. Cherry juice and rum were mixed to create Cherry Bounce, a bitter but highly favored cordial. The bark was used in the production of drugs to treat bronchitis, and cherry stalks were used to make tonics.  Early printmakers used cherry for their engraving blocks. The native range of the cherry is from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico nearly exactly the eastern half of the U.S. The cherry is a member of the almond family.
Antique Walnut

Our Antique Walnut reclaimed wood flooring ranges in color from the dark chocolate brown of the heartwood to the light cream, nearly white sapwood. It is mostly straight-grained, but waviness does occur nearing a knot. Like cherry, walnut darkens with age. This floor is slightly less durable than oak and should be treated like a fine piece of furniture.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Hardness (Janka): 1010
Common name(s): American Walnut, Black Walnut, Eastern Walnut
Scientific name(s): Juglans nigra
Like the American Cherry, the Black Walnut tree was valued by Colonial Americans for its fruit, its medicinal properties and furniture. Walnut tree extracts have been used for centuries to make ink and dyes and, back even further, the Egyptians used walnut kernel oil to embalm mummies by replacing the blood with walnut oil. In more modern times, walnut hulls are used diversely and unexpected as a metal polish, as a thermal insulator in rocket nose cones and as an environmentally friendly means of cleaning the exteriors of buildings.
Antique Character Heartpine

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Antique Character Heartpine reclaimed planks contain 70% - 100% heartwood, varying grain patterns and knots.  There are infrequent nail holes and hairline cracks. A very rustic and informal floor that has maximum character and minimum patina.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Antique Select Heartpine

Antique Select Heartpine reclaimed planks contain 90% - 100% heartwood, very infrequent nail holes, tight knots (max 1-1/2") and occasional hairline cracks. A very durable floor that represents the Classic Heartpine look that works well with both rustic and contemporary decors. This floor has medium character and minimum patina.

100% Recycled/LEED MRc3: Material Reuse

Hardness (Janka): 875-1225 (varies w/growth ring density)
Common name(s): Heartpine, Pitch Pine, Dade County Pine
Scientific name(s):Pinus palustris
Prized for its length, strength and resin, Longleaf Yellow Pine originally grew in a wide coastal swath from the Carolinas to Louisiana. In colonial times it was the most economically important tree and was sought after by the King of England for ship building; the largest were tagged for the "Crown." Due to extensive logging and agricultural development, by the 1930´s nearly all of the old growth trees were gone. Today the only source for true old growth heartpine is from factories and warehouses. Beware of anyone who would have you believe otherwise.